Yarn Line Up

Yarn Line Up Autumn/Winter 2018

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1.  Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable Wensleydale from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is spun in the UK and sent to me directly from the farm. The photo story from my visit to the farm is coming soon, as part of my Scarf Story project. The yarn is in it’s natural colour, undyed.

1.

Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable Wensleydale from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is spun in the UK and sent to me directly from the farm. The photo story from my visit to the farm is coming soon, as part of my Scarf Story project. The yarn is in it’s natural colour, undyed.

2.  Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable shetland from the same farm as the Wensleydale, in Richmond, North Yorkshire. Again, the yarn is sent to me directly from the farm, and this natural, undyed shade was used in some of my new scarves. I also wound this yarn into skeins and sent this directly to my natural dyer Paula Goosen of Moel View Yarn, to be dyed to my bespoke colours.

2.

Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable shetland from the same farm as the Wensleydale, in Richmond, North Yorkshire. Again, the yarn is sent to me directly from the farm, and this natural, undyed shade was used in some of my new scarves. I also wound this yarn into skeins and sent this directly to my natural dyer Paula Goosen of Moel View Yarn, to be dyed to my bespoke colours.

3.  Naturally dyed Shetland - Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable shetland from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is sent directly to me from the farm, I then wound it into skeins by hand using a niddy-noddy, and sent to Paula Goosen of Moel View Yarn, who dyed this shade using responsibly sourced indigo from Jaipur.

3.

Naturally dyed Shetland - Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable shetland from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is sent directly to me from the farm, I then wound it into skeins by hand using a niddy-noddy, and sent to Paula Goosen of Moel View Yarn, who dyed this shade using responsibly sourced indigo from Jaipur.

4.  Naturally dyed Shetland - Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable shetland from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is sent directly to me from the farm, I then wound it into skeins by hand using a niddy-noddy, and sent to Paula Goosen of Moel View Yarn, who dyed this shade using fair trade black tea and responsibly sourced lac from Jaipur, a substance found on the trees that the lac insect lives on in Asian countries, this is a natural dye used very often for pink and red shades.

4.

Naturally dyed Shetland - Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable shetland from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is sent directly to me from the farm, I then wound it into skeins by hand using a niddy-noddy, and sent to Paula Goosen of Moel View Yarn, who dyed this shade using fair trade black tea and responsibly sourced lac from Jaipur, a substance found on the trees that the lac insect lives on in Asian countries, this is a natural dye used very often for pink and red shades.

4.  Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable Wensleydale from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is spun in the UK and sent to me directly from the farm, and then sent onto Paintbox Textiles, the organic dyeing factory that I work with in Liversedge, Yorkshire. The photo story from my visit to the factory is coming soon, as part of my Scarf Story project. The yarn is dyed to Global Organic Textiles Standards (GOTS) and is Soil Association Certified Organic.

4.

Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable Wensleydale from Richmond, North Yorkshire. The yarn is spun in the UK and sent to me directly from the farm, and then sent onto Paintbox Textiles, the organic dyeing factory that I work with in Liversedge, Yorkshire. The photo story from my visit to the factory is coming soon, as part of my Scarf Story project. The yarn is dyed to Global Organic Textiles Standards (GOTS) and is Soil Association Certified Organic.

5.  North Welsh Alpaca - Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable Alpaca from Sodom, North Wales. I found Michael and Celia, the couple behind these north welsh alpaca yarns, a little too late and they have just stopped producing yarns as they are retiring, having kept the alpacas at their smallholding and spun the yarn themselves using ‘mini mill’ equipment for many years. The equipment has been sold on to a smallholding in Shropshire who I’m going to visit in January, so I’m hopeful for more single farm, traceable British Alpaca. The yarn is used in its natural shades of ecru and charcoal.

5.

North Welsh Alpaca - Slaughter and cruelty free, single farm, traceable Alpaca from Sodom, North Wales. I found Michael and Celia, the couple behind these north welsh alpaca yarns, a little too late and they have just stopped producing yarns as they are retiring, having kept the alpacas at their smallholding and spun the yarn themselves using ‘mini mill’ equipment for many years. The equipment has been sold on to a smallholding in Shropshire who I’m going to visit in January, so I’m hopeful for more single farm, traceable British Alpaca. The yarn is used in its natural shades of ecru and charcoal.

6.  World Fair Trade Organisation Peruvian Alpaca, shorn by hand from local alpacas and hand spun by the Puskariy Tika Cooperative who are a part of ‘Awamaki’, a non-profit organisation based in Ollantaytambo who support 8 cooperatives of hand spinners, weavers and knitters. The Puskariy Tika cooperative has thirteeen members: Marta, Gregoria, Virginia, Hilda, Dionicia, Francisca, Exaltacion, Simeona, Flora, Paulina, Nicolasa, Benita and Damiana who each spin alpaca yarn by hand as part of their work for the cooperative within the Huilloc community.

6.

World Fair Trade Organisation Peruvian Alpaca, shorn by hand from local alpacas and hand spun by the Puskariy Tika Cooperative who are a part of ‘Awamaki’, a non-profit organisation based in Ollantaytambo who support 8 cooperatives of hand spinners, weavers and knitters. The Puskariy Tika cooperative has thirteeen members: Marta, Gregoria, Virginia, Hilda, Dionicia, Francisca, Exaltacion, Simeona, Flora, Paulina, Nicolasa, Benita and Damiana who each spin alpaca yarn by hand as part of their work for the cooperative within the Huilloc community.

Read more about Awamaki’s wonderful work here

Slaughter Free Yarn by Izzy Lane

Organic Dyeing by Paintbox Textiles

Natural Dyeing by Moel View Yarn

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